Fog-Harvesting

Morocco’s Fog-Harvesting Technology Turns Fog into Drinking Water

If you open your daily newspapers, the news about Ground Water Depletion can be seen every other day. Water Depletion is an issue the world is facing and trying to find solutions for it every day. With Global Warming constantly increasing, we are losing fresh and oxygenated water like sand from our fingertips. 

Morocco is the home to this unique project to save water. Condensation is a process by which molecules of water vapor combine to make tiny liquid water droplets that hang in the air. You can see fog because of these tiny water droplets. This leads to the formation of Fog. 

CloudFisher Net, a fog-harvesting project developed by engineer Peter Trautwein of the German Water Foundation, is a structure with tiny triangles sandwiched between a robust grid made from plastic. 

How Does it Work?

When wind flows through the CloudFisher Net, it traps water droplets within its triangle-like structure. These water droplets then fall downwards through the net into the reservoir where water is collected. 

This triangle-like structure is made from a rigid yet flexible material that not only collects water droplets but also reduces the impact of the flowing wind to prevent any damage to the structure. 

How Much Water Can This Structure Harvest?

Depending on the region, time of the year, and the flow of the wind, the Fog-Harvesting project can harvest between four to fourteen liters of water per square meter of the net. The project is already showing its impact on the households around the villages and towns in Morocco. They no longer have to spend hours walking to far-off places to fetch a pail of water; enabling them to grow crops efficiently and support their families and livelihood. 

When this project achieves its set goal, around 1,150 villages will have access to 18 liters of water per day. Comparing it to their previous conditions of getting less than 8 liters per day, Fog-Harvesting technology has the power to improve thousands of lives. 

“All over the world, this idea fails because of its construction, not because of the principle. On the day of my visit, I was determined to design a maintenance-free and effective system,” explains Mr. Trautwein. 

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