Spanish Stonehenge

Spanish Drought Reveals Old Submerged “Spanish Stonehenge”

While Spain goes through the country’s worst drought in decades, the situation there is leaving the world baffled. The water level dropped by around 28%. However, this lead to a fascinating discovery that no one could’ve predicted or foreseen. 

Near the corners of the Valdecanas Reservoir in the Central Province of Caceres, Archaeologists observed a neolithic stone circle structure. The stones have been believed to have existed since 5000 BC. 

The stone structure is called “Spanish Stonehenge”, officially came named the “Dolmen of Guadalperal”.

The Structure of The “Spanish Stonehenge”

The Spanish Stonehenge is a structure of vertically arranged stones mounted on a horizontal boulder. Some suspect the structure is meant to be Tombs as human remains have been found in several such structures. To a tourist moving about, these stones might just look like just a set of haphazardly scattered stones. 

Another interesting fact is that this Structure was previously discovered by German Archaeologist Hugo Obermaier way back in 1926; due to floods and other causes, the structure was yet again submerged only to be reemerged now. 

How are the Locals seeing it?

The drought-stricken Locals of the area find this as an opportunity for tourist attraction. While someone who owns a boat thinks they could use their boat to take tourists near the Dolmen, some locals also think shifting the Stone Structure into a Local Museum is the correct option. A petition has been filed on Change.org for the transfer which currently has over 40,000 signatures. 

The stone structure, said to have existed since 5000 BC, is deteriorating as the rock has become porous and will further have more damaged if not given the proper care and redevelopment. 

“It’s a surprise, it’s a rare opportunity to be able to access it,” says archaeologist Enrique Cedillo from Madrid’s Comp. 

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